As most of you know, I’m a HUGE 252Basics fan. I love all things Orange and champion them whenever I can. What I love most about the curriculum is that it’s a strategy that encourages a partnership between what’s happening at church and what’s happening at home.

Meaning, the curriculum assumes that I, as a parent, am part of the learning process for my child. When this light bulb finally came on for me as a parent (not just as the children’s pastor), how I interacted with what Liam brought home each week changed. More importantly, my kids really started to “get” what they were learning about each week. (Yes, even pastors struggle with this parenting thing from time to time!)

Here are a few suggestions to make the most out of what your kids are learning on the weekends.

1. Fridge cards: I realize that on the surface these look like scrap-paper waiting to happen. They’re the perfect size to keep by the phone to jot down a note or two. This also makes them the perfect size to put on the fridge or dashboard of the car to reference throughout the week. If you read nothing else that comes home from church with your child, the fridge card is the place to start. You’ll find topic for the month, the memory verse, and the story we studied.

2. Study along with your kids: On the Fridge Card you’ll find the passage of Scripture that we studied, take time to read the story for yourself. This will be a great way to set an example for them as you can talk about what you’re learning while you read the passage. You’ll be demonstrating to your kids that spending time in God’s Word should be a top priority in your family’s life.

3. God-Time Pages: My second grader loves doing his God-time cards. He gets his Bible and dives in to look up the different verses and complete the activities. This past week he left without getting a sheet. He charged me with making SURE that I brought one home for him. The parent’s role in this could be simple as to reading the page before it gets handed off. If you have younger kids who can’t read yet, you may want to sit down with your kids and help them look up the verses.

4. Follow up: For most kids, anything in life is rather out of sight-out of mind. Help keep them focused throughout the week. Ask questions about how they put the Big Idea into practice. Bring up the memory verse or have them teach it to you. Encourage them when you see them putting the God’s Big Idea into practice. Use the same vocabulary they use at church to help support and reinforce what’s happening on the weekends.

5. Cue Box: I’ve already written a post about my Cue-Box love here. But if you want your kids to love learning more about the topics they’re discussing on the weekends, the Cue-Box is a great place to start.

 

I’ve been surprised that by just adding a few simple discussions and activities into the daily routine how much more our kids are getting out of the 252 lessons. They learn a lot at church, but that’s only the beginning. Jenna and I need to continue the discussion at home.

How about you? What are some of your best ideas for keeping your kids focused on faith throughout the week?

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